Posts By: Branch Hill Farm

Upcoming Forestry Walk through Branch Hill Farm on October 3rd!

Join MMRG for a free forestry walk through Branch Hill Farm in Wakefield, NH on Saturday, October 3rd from 10:00am-12:00pm, with licensed forester Daniel Stepanauskas.

After graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a degree in Forestry in 1978, Stepanauskas began his career with the US Forest Service examining forest stands in the Cascade Mountains in Washington state. After moving back to New Hampshire in 1981, he worked for the Kennett Company in Conway, planning the management of 10,000 acres of forest. He started consulting soon after, including a position certifying the sustainability of forests for the Forest Stewardship Council and a recent job arranging a carbon sequestration contract in NH, and has worked with land owners, towns, businesses, and land trusts for three decades. His primary goal is to maintain healthy, fully stocked forests.

Participants will join Daniel on a walk through the Branch Hill Farm property in Wakefield, as together we learn techniques for maintaining and promoting fully stocked forests in balance with sustainable human use. This is becoming increasingly complex due to a changing climate. In the real world of forest land ownership in NH,  these issues are also linked to forest product markets and the ability to make the work affordable for logging contractors. 

Daniel will lead us through questions such as: how do we grow tree species that survive climate changes, while also producing wood products that increase carbon sequestration? The group will learn and think about specific wildlife habitats, vertical structure, soft mast species, and forest pH. All are encouraged to attend with an open mind and plenty of questions for Daniel. This conversation is vital – growing tree species and wood products that increase carbon sequestration is key to preparing us for the future!

To offer safe outdoor activities during COVID-19, all participants are required to wear masks and to practice proper social distancing. While we are pleased to offer this as a free activity,  space is limited to 15 people. Spots will fill quickly, so register soon! Please contact Kari Lygren at mmrgnh@gmail.com, or by calling 603-473-2020, for more information and to sign up.

New Woods, Water & Wildlife Explorers Club for Families

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
(603) 473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Submission Date: June 29, 2020

New Woods, Water & Wildlife Explorers Club for Families

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG) and Branch Hill Farm (BHF) are teaming up to present a new self-guided outdoor activity program for families called the Woods, Water & Wildlife Explorers Club. With a Passport for families to track their progress and earn prizes, these free self-scheduled activities will provide an opportunity for kids and their families to have fun outside together this summer while learning about the natural world. The WWW Explorers Club is offered as an alternative to the annual Woods, Water & Wildlife Festival that MMRG and BHF have reluctantly cancelled this year out of concern for public health and safety.

‘Woods, Water & Wildlife’ sums up the themes of the interactive Explorers Club events.  The ‘Woods’ category offers ‘Learn Your Leaves,’ with leaf photos of local tree species to help you identify trees at Casey Road Conservation Land or in your own backyard. Two Club activities feature water themes. ‘Family Fishing Fun’ invites families to try fishing at a local farm pond.  ‘Waterside Explorations’ suggests ideas for getting wet and exploring a stream or pond close to home.  The ‘Wildlife’ category includes ‘Rainy Day Adventures’ with virtual presentations by Squam Lakes Natural Science Center and ‘Birds, Blooms and Bugs,’ which encourages children to write a poem, paint a picture, or take a photograph with a nature theme. Several activities promote fun while learning about all three W’s, such as ‘Seasons of Change at Branch Hill Farm’ which takes families on a self-guided walk through BHF’s fields and forest and down to the river.

MMRG Educational Outreach Coordinator Kari Lygren is organizing the ‘Seasons of Change’ walk. She explained, “Families will receive a map to follow with eighteen different stops. Each stop corresponds to a post installed at the Farm with a sign showing fun questions to answer or suggestions of what to look for. When I tried out the whole activity, the pond stop was my favorite. It was fun to see so much life there: birds were active, there was an animal track leading down to the water, fish were jumping and bullfrogs croaking! I really like the wild apple trees too; we saw a flock of turkeys near the trees at the back of the field.”

Joining the WWW Explorers Club is free and simple. Families can download the Passport and find out more details about the program at  https://mmrg.info/mmrg-in-action/explorers-club/.  Supplemental materials will be available online for some Club activities, to learn more about any of the activities, call Kari Lygren at 603-978-7125 or email her at wwwexplorersclub@gmail.com.

MMRG Vice Chair Lorrie Drake is excited about the new WWW Explorers Club alternative to the WWW Festival. “We are very sorry to have to cancel the Festival but we expect it to return next year. Meanwhile, we’ve developed some great activities for families to try and we think you and your kids will have fun, experience new things, and learn a lot about nature. We’d love to hear from you as you complete the activities on your Passport. And due to the generosity of Bartlett Tree Service, the first fifty families who register will receive a free sapling!”

BHF Executive Director Jared Kane added, “Although we were deeply saddened not to be able to host the festival this year, we immediately saw the importance of providing families with a way to get outside and enjoy the outdoors in these challenging times.   We are excited to once again team up with MMRG for the Explorers Club and to offer ‘Seasons of Change’ and ‘Family Fishing Fun’ at Branch Hill Farm. All members of the family can enjoy and learn from these special activities.”

MMRG is grateful to the WWW Explorers Club underwriters, the Siemon Company and Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust, and to major sponsor D. F. Richard Energy. Thanks also to prize donors Bartlett Tree Service, Peter Goodwin, McKenzie’s Farm, the Pink House, and Cynthia Wyatt. With Explorers Club activities being promoted throughout the summer, new business sponsors will have plenty of opportunities to be recognized. Interested businesses may call Education Coordinator Kari Lygren at 603-4978-7125, email mmrgnh@gmail.com or visit www.mmrg.info/sponsorship.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. Moose Mountains Regional Greenways, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. For more information and a calendar of upcoming events, visit www.mmrg.info

 

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways Offers ‘Using a Map to Find Your Way’

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 3/4/2020

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways Offers ‘Using a Map to Find Your Way’

On Sunday afternoon, March 29, Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG) will offer a family activity for kids and adults to learn to navigate using a map. The ‘Using a Map to Find Your Way’ workshop is part of MMRG’s 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ program, intended to encourage the next generation of conservationists by offering families ways to have fun together outside while learning about the natural world.

MMRG Board member Peter Goodwin will lead the activity with help from MMRG staff and volunteers. Goodwin, a former high school science teacher, has been making maps for 30 years and working with people, young and old, to help them learn how to better use maps. This workshop is for kids ten and up with an accompanying adult or anyone sixteen or older who wants to learn to use a map.

Maps are everywhere and people use them all the time, often without being aware of it. For example, most people take for granted a voice on their GPS telling them how to drive to an unfamiliar destination, based on an electronic mapping program. Goodwin is eager to teach kids and adults how to find their own way. He asks, “Do you know how to use a map without a voice? If you were given a treasure map with ‘X’ marking the spot, could you find the treasure?”

For this ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ workshop, each family will be given a map and instructions about what the symbols on it mean. Families will use the map to navigate around Branch Hill Farm and find the points marked on the map representing places or objects of interest on the farm. Time permitting, families will find their way down to the Salmon Falls River and see early signs of spring. Goodwin is encouraging, “You won’t get lost, because you will have a map! And I think you’ll find that navigation is easier than it seems. Prepare to have fun as you find your way around Branch Hill Farm.”

‘Using a Map to Find Your Way’ will take place from 1 to 3 pm on Sunday, March 29. Compasses will be provided but families are encouraged to bring their own, if they have them, and to wear footwear appropriate for muddy trails or wet grassy fields. The workshop is free to MMRG member families but pre-registration is required. Non-members are encouraged to try out their first ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ event for free. For more information, directions, and to pre-register, call MMRG’s Educational Outreach Coordinator Kari Lygren at (603) 978-7125 or email mmrgnh@gmail.com. Interested families may join MMRG with an online donation of $25 per household per year at https://mmrg.info/become-a-member/ or inquire about available scholarships by calling 603-473-2020.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see branchillfarm.org. MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. For more information, a calendar of upcoming educational events, and the full list of 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ activities, visit www.mmrg.info.

 

Peter in peru

Peter in Peru

 

Snowflake Workshop and Walk with Professor Jennifer Jacobs

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 2/27/2020

Snowflake Workshop and Walk with Professor Jennifer Jacobs

On Saturday morning, March 28, Moose Mountains Regional Greenways and Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust (BHF/CSFCT) will offer a fun and educational outdoor workshop about snowflakes. Professor Jennifer Jacobs will lead the walk at Branch Hill Farm in Milton Mills to look at snow and share information about how the warming climate is affecting snowfall and the structure of snowflakes. This event was rescheduled due to extreme cold on the previous date.

Jacobs teaches Civil Engineering at the University of New Hampshire and spends much of her time learning about how the changing climate is impacting the natural and built world around us. Her interest in the effects of climate change on snow has been stimulated in recent years by noticing the ‘crazy’ winter weather and changing size and characteristics of snowflakes, such as flakes engorged to excess size after falling through alternating cold and warm atmospheric layers. Scientists are interested in how such differently-shaped flakes affect snow melting, which in turn may impact our water resources and landscape.

The first portion of the workshop will be indoors, where workshop participants will learn how to use instrumentation to measure and observe snow; to identify different types of snow and snowflakes; and to observe how they change based on weather conditions. The remainder of the workshop will be a walk outdoors in the snow with the group locating and distinguishing different types of snow and snowflakes as well as patterns that trees and wind have made in the snow.

Jacobs is excited to share her love of snow: “The best way to enjoy a New England winter is to get outside and see the amazing show that the winter weather provides. With just a little bit of help, anyone from age 5 to 100 can learn to see and appreciate the many varieties of snow and snowflakes.”

The workshop will take place 10 am – 12 pm on Saturday, March 28. It is free and open to all ages but pre-registration is required by noon on Friday, March 27. Snowshoes are recommended; if there is no snow, the workshop will be postponed until next winter. For more information, directions and to register, contact MMRG Education Coordinator Kari Lygren at 603-978-7125 or email mmrgnh@gmail.com.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. For more information and a calendar of upcoming events, visit www.mmrg.info.

Jacobs&Winn

Jacobs & Winn

Jacobs & Vuyovich snow survey

Jacobs & Vuyovich snow survey

MMRG Families Followed Coyote Tracks, Enjoyed Sledding

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 1/10/2020

MMRG Families Followed Coyote Tracks, Enjoyed Sledding

The snow-covered fields and snowy woods of Branch Hill Farm made for a fun morning outside, enjoyed by a couple dozen parents, grandparents and kids signed up for a ‘Family Snowshoe Tracking’ activity. The event was offered by Moose Mountains Regional Greenways as part of its MOOSE-ies for Families program and co-sponsored by Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust (BHF/CSFCT).

From infants in backpacks up to late elementary school kids, children and their families had a great time. Kids, wearing snowshoes provided by MMRG, followed a line of coyote tracks heading straight across the field up to the edge of the icy pond. MMRG Education Coordinator Kari Lygren explained, “Dogs tend to wander as they walk, but coyotes can’t count on regular meals so typically walk in a straight path to conserve energy.” Indeed, the coyote had continued straight across the ice. The families, however, skirted the pond and headed into the forest on a woods road, where they encountered more coyote tracks coming from the forest. The children observed that the animal had approached the opening to the field but turned around, perhaps reluctant to venture out into the open.

A hike through the woods was rewarded with a view of the scenic Branch River and the call of a blue jay. Afterwards, the children got a thrill out of sledding on a variety of flying saucers and sleds generously provided for the day by the Terry family. A few initial runs created a track on the hill of fresh snow, and then the sleds flew down at high speed, to the great satisfaction of both children and adults.

MOOSE-ies for Families events are a membership benefit for MMRG member families, but non-members are encouraged to try out their first family activity for free. The 2020 MOOSE-ies for Families series includes Birdhouse Building (March), Using a Map to Find Your Way (also in March), Following a Stream (May), the annual Woods, Water & Wildlife Festival (second Saturday in August), Night Time Walk (September), Photography Scavenger Hunt (October), and Natural Holiday Decorations (December). Interested families may join MMRG with an online donation of $25 per household per year at www.mmrg.info or inquire about available scholarships by calling 603-473-2020.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources; see www.mmrg.info.

 

Frankie Dineen pointing to coyote tracks (Photo by Rachel Towne)

Frankie Dineen pointing to coyote tracks (Photo by Rachel Towne)

Snowshoe walk (Photo by Rachel Towne)

Snowshoe walk (Photo by Rachel Towne)

Orchardist John Bunker: ‘A History of Apples in New England’

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 1/7/2020

Orchardist John Bunker: ‘A History of Apples in New England’

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG) and Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust (BHF/CSFCT) will present orchardist, gardener and apple historian John Bunker for a presentation about the history of apples in New England. The workshop will take place at 11 am on Saturday, April 4 at the Town of Middleton Old Town Hall, 200 Kings Highway, Middleton, NH.

In the early 1980’s, John Bunker started the mail-order nursery Fedco Trees, a division of the cooperative, Fedco Seeds. In 2012, he founded the Maine Heritage Orchard in Unity Maine. His recent book, Apples and the Art of Detection recounts his forty years of tracking down, identifying and preserving rare apples. Branch Hill Farm Executive Director Jared Kane is thrilled at Bunker’s planned visit, saying “John is the pre-eminent expert on heritage apples and we are so privileged to have him come speak to us!”

From the 17th to the early 20th century, thousands of varieties of heirloom apples (malus domestica) dominated the New England landscape, yet today only a handful are found in our grocery aisles. Bunker will address what has become of this historic wealth of varieties and what made them so special. He’ll give examples of lesser known apples such as Nodhead, Milden, and Granite Beauty and what they have in common. Anyone interested in apples and pears, agricultural history, New England history, cider, or simply curious about the old tree in their yard is encouraged to attend and bring questions.

Kane adds that the workshop with Bunker is a kickoff to the planting of a new Heritage Orchard at Branch Hill Farm in Milton Mills. Explains Kane, “This holistically managed orchard will feature historically grown apples and pears in the Moose Mountain and greater New England regions. Many of these will be cloned from old trees still surviving in back yards and fields. If you have an old apple tree you think should be included or have more questions about the Heritage Orchard please contact me at jared_kane@branchhillfarm.org.”

The workshop is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is helpful but not required. For more information or directions or to register, contact MMRG Education Coordinator Kari Lygren at 603-978-7125 or email mmrgnh@gmail.com.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. For more information and a calendar of upcoming events, visit www.mmrg.info.

Photo of Bunker, taken by Russell French

Photo of Bunker, taken by Russell French

 

Susan Morse Presents “The Cougar Returns to the East”

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH 03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 1/8/2020

Susan Morse Presents “The Cougar Returns to the East”

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG) will present renowned wildlife expert and photographer Susan Morse for a weekend of events that will delight all who are fascinated by North American native wildlife, especially the elusive cougar. On Friday, February 21, Morse will give a 75-minute slide show introduction to cougar biology and ecology at Kingswood High School Auditorium in Wolfeboro. Two wildlife tracking workshops on Saturday, February 22, will provide opportunities for learning from the expert in a small group setting out in our local woods.

Cougars are unquestionably returning to eastern North America, with cougar dispersals and occupancy now documented in a growing list of eastern states and provinces. Along with her magnificent photographs of cougars in the broad diversity of habitats where she has studied them, Morse will give the lowdown on the latest confirmations of cougars in the east, including the suitability of wild habitats from Maine to Georgia. Sam Evans-Brown of NHPR’s Outside/In will moderate the Q&A discussion that follows.

Morse’s workshops and lecture/slide shows are popular throughout New England. Jane Winn of Berkshire Environmental Action Team affirmed, “We bring Sue Morse back every year with different programs, but the cougar presentation attracts the most people. And she always adds something new! It’s both entertaining and educational and has her amazing photos of cougars of all ages.” Winn concluded,” You’re going to love her presentation!”

The wildlife tracking workshops are part of Morse’s award-winning ‘Keeping Track’ program that teaches concerned adults and children to observe, interpret, and record evidence of wildlife in their region. Participants will get to explore our local forests, identifying and tracking our native species while asking questions and learning from Morse’s lifetime of experience. MMRG volunteer Cindy Barstow, who has taken several ‘Keeping Track’ walks, offered this description, “She’s great at bringing alive all the nature stories happening right outside your home every night!”

‘The Cougar Returns to the East’ slide show on Friday, February 21 starts at 7 pm at Kingswood High School Performing Arts Center Auditorium, 396 South Main St, Wolfeboro. Tickets are $10 general admission or $5 for youth/students with ID, available at the door or in advance online at www.mmrg.info.

The Keeping Track workshop will be offered for a cost of $35 on Saturday, February 22; participants may choose a workshop from 9 am – 12 pm or from 1 – 4 pm. Advance registration is required by 5 pm on Wednesday, February 18; online signup is available at www.mmrg.info or call MMRG Education Coordinator Kari Lygren at 603-978-7125. Participation is limited to 20 people in each workshop so early registration is encouraged. Workshops will require moderate hiking and other outdoor physical activity in potentially inclement weather. The location within MMRG’s seven town service area will be chosen based on conditions just prior to the event.

MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers regular educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. More information and a calendar of upcoming events are available at www.mmrg.info. MMRG would like to thank Meredith Village Savings Bank and Eastern Propane for sponsoring this Sue Morse program of events. Space is still available for additional sponsors. Businesses interested in learning more about sponsorships may contact Jill Eldredge, Executive Director, at jill.mmrg@gmail.com.

Photograph © Susan C. Morse

 

Photo of Sue Morse

Photo by Sue of cougar leaping river

Photo by Sue of cougar leaping river

Snowflake Workshop and Walk with Professor Jennifer Jacobs

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways
Box 191, Union, NH  03887
603-473-2020
info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 1/8/2020

Snowflake Workshop and Walk with Professor Jennifer Jacobs

On Saturday morning, February 8, Moose Mountains Regional Greenways and Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust (BHF/CSFCT) will offer a fun and educational outdoor workshop about snowflakes. Professor Jennifer Jacobs will lead the walk at Branch Hill Farm in Milton Mills to look at snow and share information about how the warming climate is affecting snowfall and the structure of snowflakes.

Jacobs is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New Hampshire and Founder and Director of The Infrastructure and Climate Network. Her interest in the impact of climate change on snow has been stimulated in recent years by noticing snowflakes engorged to excess size after falling through alternating cold and warm atmospheric layers.  Scientists want a better understanding of how such differently-shaped flakes affect snow melting, which in turn may impact our water resources and landscape.

The workshop will take place 10 am – 12 pm on Saturday, February 8. It is free and open to all ages but pre-registration is required by noon on Friday, February 7.  For more information, directions and to register, contact MMRG Education Coordinator Kari Lygren at 603-978-7125 or email mmrgnh@gmail.com.

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land and offers many educational opportunities to inform all ages about the benefits of our region’s natural resources. For more information and a calendar of upcoming events, visit www.mmrg.info

Snowflake on Kari's breezeway door

Snowflake on Kari’s breezeway door

Jennifer Jacobs

Big snowflakes on teneriffe

 

Snowshoe Tracking — first event of 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ Program

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways

Box 191, Union, NH  03887

603-473-2020

info@mmrg.info

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 12/23/2019


Snowshoe Tracking — first event of 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ Program

On Sunday morning, January 18, Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG) and Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust (BHF/CSFCT) will jointly offer a kids’ snowshoe walk and tracking activity. Snowshoe tracking is the first event of MMRG’s 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ program, intended to encourage the next generation of conservationists by offering families ways to have fun together outside while learning about the natural world.

At MMRG’s previous family snowshoe event, kids went sledding, tried out walking in snowshoes, listened for bird songs at the edge of the woods and crowded around the leaders as they pointed out signs of wildlife along a snowy trail. Anticipating the upcoming event, MMRG’s Educational Outreach Coordinator Kari Lygren says, “We’ll look for signs of wildlife and talk about the animal stories that we can read in the snow. We always have a great time because kids are so curious and love to explore!”

The Snowshoe Tracking event will take place from 10 am to 12 pm at Branch Hill Farm in Milton Mills, led by MMRG staff and volunteers.  Kids-sized snowshoes will be available as well as a few loaner snowshoes for adults. Children of all ages with their families are welcome but pre-registration is required. ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ events are a membership benefit for MMRG member families, but non-members are encouraged to try out their first family activity for free. For more information, directions, and to pre-register, call MMRG’s Educational Outreach Coordinator Kari Lygren at (603) 978-7125 or email mmrgnh@gmail.com.

The updated 2020 ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ series includes Birdhouse Building (March), Using a Map to Find Your Way (also in March), Following a Stream (May), the annual Woods, Water & Wildlife Festival (second Saturday in August), Night Time Walk (September), Photography Scavenger Hunt (October), and Natural Holiday Decorations (December). Interested families may join MMRG with an online donation of $25 per household per year at www.mmrg.info  or inquire about available scholarships by calling 603-473-2020.

MMRG, a non-profit land trust, works to conserve and connect important water resources, farm and forest lands, wildlife habitats, and recreational land in Brookfield, Farmington, Middleton, Milton, New Durham, Wakefield, and Wolfeboro. For more information and a calendar of upcoming educational events, visit www.mmrg.info.  Branch Hill Farm/Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices; see www.branchillfarm.org. ‘MOOSE-ies for Families’ events are made possible in part through the generous support of local business and community sponsors. If you are interested in sponsoring this program on behalf of your business, please contact Jill Eldredge, Executive Director, at jill.mmrg@gmail.com.

 

Identifying tracks by Kari Lygren

Identifying tracks by Kari Lygren

Looking at animal scat by Amy Gardner

Looking at animal scat by Amy Gardner

Looking at tracks by emily Lord

Looking at tracks by emily Lord

Families looking at signs in the snow by Emily Lord

Families looking at signs in the snow by Emily Lord

Branch Hill Farm Hires Jared Kane as New Executive Director

Branch Hill Farm

Contact: Jared Kane, Executive Director

307 Applebee Rd, Milton Mills, NH 03852

603-473-2535

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Submission Date:  December 4, 2019

 

Branch Hill Farm Hires Jared Kane as New Executive Director

 

Jared KaneBranch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust is pleased to announce that Jared Kane of Milton Mills, NH has been hired as the new Executive Director. He started the job on November 4th.

 

“We are thrilled to have Jared Kane as our new Executive Director,” said Cynthia Wyatt, who is soon to retire as Branch Hill Farm (BHF) Managing Trustee, but will stay on as Chair of the BHF Board of Directors. “For the last two years, Jared has generously donated his time and expertise to teach our apple tree grafting workshops, which have been extremely popular.  Last summer, when Jared presented his idea to plant a Heritage Orchard at Branch Hill Farm, I was very excited. The orchard would be a new direction for BHF while meshing superbly with our mission and educational outreach programs.  Jared has all the values and qualifications to be an excellent Executive Director for Branch Hill Farm.”

Kane is a New Hampshire native, with a BA in History from the University of New Hampshire. Although his work experience is primarily in the tech field, he dedicates much of his free time to preserving and identifying antique apple varieties on ancient trees in our region. Since moving to Milton Mills in 2013, Kane has been building up a cider specific apple orchard and currently grows over eighty varieties.  His natural hard cider has won international awards. 

 

 Kane also developed passions for conservation and outdoor recreation from a young age. He enjoys regular hunting and hiking trips in the Maine North Woods and has been fly fishing around the world. He lives in Milton Mills with his wife Ashley and baby daughter Kenna.

 

Kane is enthusiastic about his new position. “I’m beyond excited to have joined the team at Branch Hill Farm and to support the many great projects and efforts already in place. I look forward to learning from and collaborating with our partners to ensure the continued success of the Carl Siemon legacy in conservation, education, and community.” 

 

He added, “The Heritage Orchard at Branch Hill Farm will be my keystone project.   Not only will the orchard be a repository for long forgotten heritage apple varieties, local homestead apples in the Moose Mountains region, and new experimental wild stock, but we hope to lead by example in showing that holistic and sustainable practices can be utilized in an orchard setting.”

 

Kane concluded with an expression of appreciation for Cynthia Wyatt’s leadership at Branch Hill Farm. “For more than 25 years, Cynthia has been both an inspiration and constant in the community when it comes to conservation, stewardship, and sustainability.  Her dedication to creating greenways, conserving important natural resource areas, and the education of future generations in our region through both BHF and Moose Mountains Regional Greenways is unmatched.  It is my hope that over the coming years we continue to advance all of the great things Cynthia has accomplished.  It is a real privilege to partner with her as we move forward.”

 

Branch Hill Farm/the Carl Siemon Family Charitable Trust works to protect open space and working forests and to educate the public about sound forestry, conservation and agricultural practices. For more information about the BHF mission, upcoming events and the Regional Heritage Orchard project, see www.branchillfarm.org.